Directional/complex wells

Collaboration and Optimization Processes Contribute to Ultra-ERD Offshore Well Success

The operator drilled a pair of complex, ultraextended-reach-drilling (ERD) wells a mature offshore Western Australia field despite shallow reservoir depth, extreme ERD profile, and high tortuosity requirements.

An RMWD service detected water-coning effects from offset wells at well crossings.
Fig. 1—An RMWD service detected water-coning effects from offset wells at well crossings.

The complete paper describes the extensive integrated engineering collaboration and optimization process that allowed an operator to push the drilling and completion envelope to drill a pair of complex, ultra-extended-reach-drilling (ERD) wells in the mature Wandoo field in the Carnarvon Basin offshore Western Australia. The shallow reservoir depth, extreme ERD profile, and high tortuosity requirement for the wells posed significant challenges. These were overcome with extensive planning; integrated engineering designs; application of new technology; good-quality, real-time data interpretation; and strong execution support from both rig site and town.

Introduction

The Wandoo field, in 56 m of water offshore Western Australia, was discovered in 1991 and subsequently developed and placed on production in 1993. The shallow unconsolidated sandstone reservoir consists of a heavily biodegraded oil column overlain by a gas cap and supported by a strong aquifer drive. Field infrastructure consists of a 15-well-slot manned production facility, Wandoo B, and a five-slot monopod, Wandoo A, which is tied back to Wandoo B by subsea in-field pipelines.

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