Offshore/subsea systems

Invasive Sun Coral Species Challenges Decommissioning of Structures Offshore Brazil

The paper explores the biology of the invasive Tubastraea sun coral, aiming to identify methods to eliminate or diminish its spread.

Tubastrea coccinea in orange and Tubastrea tagusensis in yellow
<i>Tubastrea coccinea i</i>n orange and<i> Tubastrea tagusensis </i>in yellow – Itacuatiba Island (Masi, Bruno et. al, 2017)

Decommissioning of offshore assets in Brazil is subject to high levels of uncertainty because of Tubastraea, an invasive species of sun coral. This species has a high capacity for dispersion and recruitment and has been associated with the replacement of native species in rocky shores, exerting a serious effect on native biodiversity. The complete paper explores the biology of the invasive species, aiming to identify methods to eliminate or diminish its spread. The authors write that data generated in this study will foster the development of effective technologies in coral-species management, whether species are invasive or threatened.

Introduction

Originally from the Coral Triangle in the Pacific Ocean—a highly diverse region with hundreds of coral species—Tubastraea was first observed in the Campos Basin in the 1980s.

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